Quest For The Tree Kangaroo: Informational Text

tree

Part One

  1. Bibliographic information

Montgomery, Sy. (2006). Quest For The Tree Kangaroo. Bishop, Nic. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.

Genre:  Children’s Literature

Age: 9 & Up

Grade Level: 3 & Up

Part Two

My Prediction of the children’s book Quest For The Tree Kangaroo was that there was going to be a lot of images and little text. When I opened the book and started glancing at it, to my surprise, there was a lot of writing, and the illustrations were real-life photographs from Guinea. I had no idea what were Tree kangaroos until I picked up the book. The book was very organized, and it had so much information about the Tree Kangaroos, and the natives of Guinea. The book was almost as a written document from the very beginning of when the explorers, and archaeologist entered the village, to the very end of their expedition. The reason that I believe this book is appropriate to be part of my classroom library and even be apart of the curriculum is because it has so much life resources and actual events of animals that are becoming extinct in our planet. This book has a lot of illustrations, and information about the text, that 3rd graders should not have a problem knowing what the image means. Quest For The Tree Kangaroo is a great book to introduce hands-on learning experiences both outside and inside the classroom. I would like us this Children’s Literacy book during “Earth Day,” for students to feel encouraged of what it means in keeping our planet safe, and clean.

Part Three

I thought this book was very long to read in one sitting. Therefore I would have to split this book into parts to focus on critical details of what this children’s book is trying to convey. The setting of this book is very different from any book that I have read because it is based on a different part of the world, introduces indigenous people, and it is in a different environment of that of California- or in the U.S.A. I feel that children will have a lot of questions about the country of Guinea, so I need to be ready to do some further research about the country and the people. Many people are talking throughout the book, so it is from the natives and the expeditioners perspective. All in all, this is an excellent book to use in all developmental aspects such as science, literacy, art, and even math (creating graphs).

Part Four

Grade level: 5th Grade

Lesson Objective:

Students will choose an animal that is close to extingshone, and will be create a google earth presentation explaining the environmental factors: habitat loss, poaching, and climate change.

Questions:

  1. Why do you think the animal that you choose is so important to its habitat?
  2. Where does your animal belong in the food chain?
  3. How does your animal contribute to the environment? (Start in its habitat, and think of the trickle down effect)
  4. What can we do as a society to help our planet?
  5. What can we do to help these animals? (Think of changes that we can make at home or at school.)

Standards-based lesson activity:

Every student will have a Chromebook computer and will research five animals that are close to extinction from all over the world. Using google docs w,e will create a list of the animals and their habitats. Each student will write their name right next to the animal they have chosen to present via Google Earth.

3 Links/ outside resources:

>https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQvrB5aRV_Q

>https://www.treehugger.com/slideshows/endangered-species/giraffes-horses-squirrels-20-animals-you-didnt-know-are-going-extinct/

>https://www.conserve-energy-future.com/most-endangered-species-on-earth.php

>https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/ocean/earthday.html

>file:///Users/anaandrade/Downloads/Education-Toolkit-022718.pdf

 

 

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Graphic Novel: The Amulet

amulet_3-book_boxset

Part One

Kibuishi, Kazu. (2008). The Stonekeeper. New York: Scholastic.

GENRE: Graphic Novels, Adventure, Fantasy, Science fiction

GRADE LEVEL: 5th grade and Up

 

Part Two

Before reading the book, I always like reading and looking at the cover to make some predictions of what the storyline might be (as always). My predictions included that there might be death, mystery, and magic involved. The reason I choose death as my prediction that uses the symbolic theme of death that continues to repeat and present itself in most of the readings that I have posted on this blog. Important issues that come across the book is the aftermath of losing a significant loved one, and how that affects the environment of those around other characters. Overall, I would display and use this book as a book of interest in my classroom, meaning that the book will be there if they find it interesting.

 

  Part Three

Themes that are common, and recur when reading the Amulet is friendship, trust, love, family, and having the ability to believing in yourself. The pressure to living up to the expectations of being a Stone Keeper, and having to defend your family is emphasized throughout the beginning of the book. It is shown at first with the father who tells the family that they will be alright, the mother who becomes the rock for her kids, and then the oldest sister, Emily who has to rescue the mother, and defend the brother while having to battle evil, while protecting and learning how to use the stone. Emily also has the pressure of living up to the expectations of her great, great, grandfather. This book touches many important elements and themes that happen on a day to day bases, which is great way to analyze with in a curriculum.

 

Part Four

 

LESSON OBJECTIVE: Students will be able to analyze and identify, main themes, and characteristics from the story and compare them to real life experiences.

 

QUESTIONS:

  1. If you had a superpower what would it be? Why?
  2. How would you use the superpower?
  3. What type of character do you see yourself being, if you were in the Amulet?
  4. What are some themes that stand out to you?
  5. How do you mirror those themes to real life events?
    1. That might be happening around you.
    2. Maybe someone you might know.

 

STANDARD- BASED LESSON ACTIVITY:

Students will pick three main themes from the comic that are similar to real life experiences. On a white piece of paper, students will then create their own comic. They will draw, write, and color, a reflection of a real life event, and how they see themselves using the Amulet to solve a difficult problem.

Extra: If students choose to they are able to make their comic strip and put in a 2.0 tool.  

 

3 LINKS FROM OUTSIDE SOURCES & RESOURCES:

 

The Perks of Being a Wallflower YA Book

Part One

Chbosky, Stephen (1999). The Perks of Being a Wallflower. Pocket Books

  • Genre: Realistic – Fiction, Young adult, Epistolary
  • Grade Level: 8th grade and Up

Part Two

  •  My prediction of the book “The Perks of Being a Wallflower,” was that it might be about a boy who is struggling to know his true identity. However, I did not expect the plot line to thicken so quickly, and jump straight to suicide. The way the author created and crafted this book was well written, especially when being written in the first person. It allowed me to see outside the window and know what is happening from the characters point of view. This is a good read, for using all three CRF activities that I have chosen from Pinterest, especially the “self-reflection, ” which can be an excellent way to either use it as an extension or as an introduction to this book, so children will be able to mirror themselves before mirroring other peoples life.

Part Three

  • The Perks of Being a Wallflower had a lot of different plots, and issues that were happening from the first-person point of view. What captured my attention is the way it was written, it was written in a way where it was directed towards the audience. Being oblivious about events that exist in the world can be very scary, I strongly feel that teaching specific topics and shinning some light on events that we are always hiding under the rug, can be a very informative learning opportunity.

Part Four
Lesson Sketch based on the book that includes a lesson objective, 2-3 discussion questions based on the book, a standards-based lesson activity, and at least three links to outside resources, websites, lesson ideas, etc. related to the book that could be used in a lesson or with your future students.
• Lesson Objective: Students will be able to analyze the development of the main character by comparing the students’ personal experience to one of the main characters in the book.

• Discussion Questions:
1. Does not knowing the character’s real names affect your attachment to them?
2. There are so many books, songs, and movies referenced in this book. What do they mean to the characters? How do they affect the way you read the book?
3. Does Charlie write more frequently when he’s happy or when he’s stressed? Why?
4. Do you like that the story is told through letters? Do you feel you know the kind of person Charlie is? His friends and family?

• Standard-based lesson Activity:
Students will create a poster board of themselves that will demonstrate a list of characteristics of themselves, both, inside and outside. Students will then create and choose a thinking map that will help them build and develop a written paper, of the similarities, and differences between the main character and themselves.

3 Links to Outside resources :

TRAILER

 

Bridge to Terabithia Challenged Book

Bridge_to_Terabithia

Part 1

Bibliography:

Paterson, Katherine (1977). Bridge to Terabithia. Thomas Crowell.

Genre:

Children’s Literature

Grade Level:  Elementary Level- Grades 6th-9th

 

Part 2

Bridge to Terabithia central plot themes consists of authentic world problems that face us on a day to day bases. The main plots talked about in this book are death, new age religion, secular humanism, satanism. This book reminded me a lot of Friends and how it sends out the message of friendship and life. Parents and teachers usually have this common misconception that children’s minds are very delicate, and when children are faced with any of these events, they might not know how to go about it in the real world. I would teach this book in my classroom because it is a great way to talk about coping mecaneisims, and being able to challenge my students way of thinking when it comes to dealing with bulling abuse, and death.

 

Part 3

There are many reasons why Bridge to Terabithia has been censored, yet it is a great book to talk about with students. As teachers, we need to guide our students into knowing what they are reading, like this book. The challenges that view in this book is the profanity used, and the way that students might view life. Children are often told not to say, or use profanity in the world because it is not right, yet adults still do it. I am not saying that I advocate for the profound language but instead we can teach students why these words are being used, the meaning behind them, and what might be the reason they are saying it in the book. Death and bullying is also part of life, and it happens around us but learning how to cope with it, is a very different thing. We can teach our students how to deal, and act when facing this challenges.

Part 4

Objective: Students will demonstrate their knowledge between the two books The Friends & Bridge to Terabithia. Each student will individually write differences, and similarities between these two books.

 Discussion Questions:

  1. How does this book relate to the book Friends by Yumoto, Kazumin
  2. How does Jess and Leslie’s relationship grown and change through out the book? And how does the relationship between the 3 boys and the older man evolve?
  3. What are some of the recurring themes in these two stories?
  4. Why where these two books censored? Where? Why?

Resources

http://www.ncte.org/library/NCTEFiles/Involved/Action/Rationale_BridgetoTerabithia.pdf

https://www.encyclopedia.com/children/academic-and-educational-journals/bridge-terabithia

https://enh295bridgetoterabithia.weebly.com/about-censorship.html

 

Batchelder book

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Part 1

Bibliography: Yumoto, Kazumi (1992). The Friends. Farrar Straus Giroux.

Genre: Fiction

Grade Level:  Elementary Level- Grades 4-7th

Part 2
Looking at the front cover of the novel, three young Asian boys hiding behind bushes, with a soccer ball. They are staring at a house in bright daylight. In big, brown, bold letter, at the top of the book is titled The Friends. What I inferred from the cover is just a book about kids being kids and just messing around, and never to my surprise did I realize that the subject of the book would be about death. It was nice to read that the younger children were learning, and becoming friends with the old man, and vise versa. This book simplifies the relationship between life and death, between the children and the older man.

Part 3
Looking through a critical lens, it demonstrates youth as curious, and inexperienced, while the older we are, the wiser we become. I would read and have this book out if ever to teach at an upper-grade level. This book is an excellent opener for the discussion of life and death. As we discuss “Authenticity and Translations” of books, I realized that this book had to go through 3 different copyrights- not including the original copy. It included an American translation, and that just makes me wonder how much of the text did they change? How much did the author agree to, for the conversion of certain cultural words? I believe that this book is aesthetic appropriate because the author himself is from Japan, so a lot of contexts is based on Japanese life. Kazumi illustrates and creates these mental visuals about Japanese towns, city life, and most importantly the education through the lens of a young Japanese boy.

Part 4
Objective: Since this book talks a lot about death, old age, and becoming of age. A great lesson plan would be to have children make an My Daily Book where children will write, color, and personalize a journal. Students will have a couple of minutes to customize and create a page, and reflect on what they had done, what would they do differently, and learned throughout that day. The idea of this project is so that when they get older, they can look back at their memories and experiences.

Discussion Questions:

  1. How do you deal with death?
  2. What do you think will happen when we die?
  3. What does your family doe when some one has died?
  4. What are your goals in life?
  5. What is a good day for you?
  6. If you had a chance what would you do with it?

Resources

https://www.uptodate.com/contents/preparing-children-for-the-loss-of-a-loved-one

https://alexisturnbullulvchildrenslit.files.wordpress.com/2015/09/the-friends-leson-plan-template.pdf

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/71072500343483427/

Multicultural/Global book

Part 1

Bibliography:

Park, Linda Sue (2002). When my Name was Keoko. Clarion Books.

 

Genre:

Historical fiction

 

Grade Level:  Elementary Level- Grades 4- Upper grades

 

Part 2

As I stare at the front cover, I notice two young children staring at each other. Two military airplanes are flying in one direction, and in the middle of the cover, in big white letters is written, When My Name was Keoko. My prediction for this book is based on the Vietnam war, about a family who is struggling to survive the hardships, and task that comes their way.

 

Part 3

The plot of the storyline is that Japan had taken over Korea, and its moral society, by destroying their culture; such as, making them change their Korean name to Japanese ones. The setting for this novel is based in Korea during World War II. I believe that the theme of this book is that one should not feel ashamed to stand up for what they believe is morally right. The style and the way the text is written was from two different first person points of views, in which the author switches between Sun-Hee and Tae-Yul. Moreover, the printed styles are quite repetitive, which makes the characters lack development.

 

Part 4

After reading the book When my Name was Keoko the students would be able to construct a power point presentation of their families roots. If the student is unable to do so, then they can build a power presentation of their cloture background. The students will be able to bring in a family heirloom to present to their class if they choose too. In the end, each student has to write a synopsis of different cultural background.

Questions:

  1. What are they most proud about themselves?
  2. Male and female and different perspectives and gender role?
  3. If they are able to travel back in time how would they handle a specific conflict differently?

 

Resources

When My Name Was Keoko Book Trailer

when-my-name-was-keoko-1

Caldecott Book

The Caldecott book that my group and I discussed for week 3 was Burton, Virginia Lee, The Little House.

 Part 1

Bibliography:

Burton, Virginia Lee (1942). The Little House. Houghton Mifflin Company.

Genre: Picture Book

Grade Level:  Elementary Level- Grades K-3rd

Part 2

The Little House was very enjoyable to read because I was able to have a connection in which the House had been feeling each time she was part of a new environment. This is a great book to use with Kindergarten all the way to 3rd grade. The author illustrates the different types of social-emotional skills the House was going through, and that is something that the students might be able to relate. This book is an excellent introduction to different, environments, weather, and seasons not just in the illustrations but also in how the text is integrated with the pictures.

Part 3

In the book, Lee gives the House a lot of emotion and personal characteristics which allows the reader to have an emotional connection. Before opening the book, the front cover has illustrations which seem to be part of the 40’s era. There is a small house in the center of the book in which it is being surrounded by the sun with a face on it, birds, trees and green grass. The House seems to be smiling at the reader, and on the driveway, in soft, bold letters it says “Her Story.” Giving the reader another clue about what the book might be.

Part 4

After reading the book The Little House the student will be able to construct, and organize the three types of Communities that they see in the book.  At the end of the project the students will also learn to identify the 4 types of seasons.

Questions:

1) What kind of community do you live in?

2) Please draw the 4 types of seasons that you see in your community?

 

Resources

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/74872412527458285/

Seasons Song Video

Urban, Suburban and Rural Communities | First and Second Grade Social Studies Lesson